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The Wonders of the World can be Fascinating

The Wonders we have never seen up close are the things that interest us the most. It is human nature to be interested, wonder what it’s like to fly by Jupiter and its moons, or live among dinosaurs. Dinosaur bones have preserved information from millions of years ago that scientists can use to model how dinosaurs appeared, moved, and lived.

Unless a real-life John Hammond constructs his own Jurassic Park, we’ll never witness long-extinct dinosaurs. However, research brings us closer to understanding what the earth was like when dinosaurs reigned over and unveiled the prehistoric landscape. Meet Cooper, the world’s largest dinosaur fossil and one of the most massive beasts ever to walk the earth. The hardest thing, they say, is waiting, and Cooper has certainly paid his dues.

The titanosaur, which lived 90 million years ago, was discovered in southwest Queensland in 2007. Still, its skeleton remained a mystery because its massive bones were housed in structures thousands of miles apart — until now. The plant-eating dinosaur had a long neck and tail, similar to Brachiosaurus, and was around the length of a basketball court and as tall as a two-story structure.

Researchers believe there is a “whole new dinosaur frontier” waiting to be uncovered in Australia due to the discovery. Have you ever awoken bleary-eyed and thought to yourself, “I feel old?” Consider how these creatures must be feeling. Microscopic Bdelloid rotifers have been resurrected after a 24,000-year hibernation in Arctic permafrost.

The tiny multicellular organisms live in watery habitats and have extraordinary survival skills. The animals were discovered in a core of frozen soil retrieved from Siberian permafrost by Russian scientists. The rotifer was able to reproduce and even eat once it had thawed out. It’s been a long time since you’ve had a well-deserved dinner.

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